Angular Roadmap | Past, Present, and Future of Angular

Angular Updates: What’s New in Version 11

As of November 2020, Angular version 11.0.0 is now available. While this release brings many updates to the platform, the most significant features include faster builds with TypeScript 4.0, component test harnesses, and ESLint updates.

Paleolithic JavaScript — SproutCore

In the beginning, there was SproutCore. It was the first comprehensive JavaScript framework aimed at making it easy to build desktop-quality single-page web apps. It’s not that this wasn’t possible before. When Google released Gmail, it showed the world that web apps really could replace complex desktop applications. Google even open-sourced the Closure toolkit — a set of libraries and an optimizing compiler that it used to build Gmail.

The Golden Age of Angular

Even before Angular version 1.0 had been released, Angular took the front-end development world by storm. Finally, we had an easy-to-use JavaScript framework that treated HTML as a first-class citizen. Developers and designers could now work together to build amazing single-page applications. This came as a relief to designers, who had been annoyed and offended because older frameworks had treated HTML and CSS as tools for barbarians, tools that no civilized developer should have to touch.

The Angular Decline? The Rise of React

The Introduction of Angular 2

Angular 2 was first announced at the ng-europe conference in 2014. The Angular team’s plans came as a shock to the Angular community, to say the least. Reaction from Angular developers was swift and negative… and not without reason. Angular 2 would be getting rid of many familiar concepts from Angular 1, introducing a new, incompatible templating language (and oh, by the way) would also be programmed using an entirely new language.

AngularJS

Although both Angular 1 and Angular 2 were called ‘Angular,’ in reality, they were very different frameworks with a few things in common. To help prevent confusion, the Angular team started referring to the old version of Angular as ‘AngularJS’, and the new version as simply ‘Angular.’ This makes intuitive sense since AngularJS was written in JavaScript, and Angular was not. To keep the distinction between the frameworks clear, I’ll be referring to Angular 1 as AngularJS from this point forward.

The Emergence of Vue

To compound AngularJS’ woes, another framework named Vue showed up at about the same time the drama over Angular 2 was occurring. Vue was inspired by AngularJS but aimed to simplify it and get rid of what Vue’s creator saw as unnecessary complexity (so Vue felt very familiar to existing AngularJS developers). Vue provided a safe haven for many AngularJS developers who didn’t want to move over to React.

Rising From the Ashes with Angular 2

Eventually, Angular 2 was released. As expected, it did away with many familiar concepts from AngularJS but kept a few of the best pieces like services and dependency injection. Fortunately for the sanity of developers, Angular uses plain TypeScript and not a fork as originally planned.

Where’s Angular 3?

Although Angular 2 wasn’t perfect, many developers of complex web applications began to realize that the new-and-improved Angular was a good fit for their needs. Fortunately for them, Angular had some exciting improvements in store. More importantly, the Angular team demonstrated that it could consistently publish new versions of the framework with few breaking changes between versions

Angular 4

Angular 4 had some significant changes, including added ahead of time compilation, which resulted in small production JavaScript bundles and shorter application load time. Support for server-side rendering was added, which was a boost for teams that wanted to render their app ahead of time to improve initial load performance. Many other improvements were added throughout the framework, but upgrading apps from Angular 2 to 4 was quick and painless in most cases.

Angular 4.3 and Angular 5

Angular 4.3 added a new HTTP client that was easier to use than the old HTTP service. In Angular 5, the old HTTP service was deprecated and would be dropped in the next release. In spite of this inconvenience, there was relatively little grumbling because the upgrade in most cases was straightforward. Angular 5 also added better internationalization support and further build optimizations.

Angular 6 and 7

Angular 8 and Angular Ivy

And that brings us to today. As we’ve seen, Angular has come a long way. It has gone from loved by web developers to being reviled to being admired, although it isn’t yet loved again like it was in its early days.

Angular Ivy

The Angular Ivy renderer will help in several ways:

  1. The renderer will be written in a much more modular fashion that the current renderer. This will make it much more amenable to tree-shaking and dead code elimination. As a result, your production JavaScript bundle will include only the code that is needed to run your application, instead of bundling together everything plus the kitchen sink as often happens with the current rendered.
  2. In addition to the bundle-size reduction and improved rendering speed, Angular Ivy has another few quality-of-life enhancements for Angular developers. Rebuild times are significantly faster. So if you’re running your app in development mode and waiting for your changes to appear, you’re now going to be spending a lot less time waiting.
  3. Template-type checking is improved, which means you’ll catch more errors at compile time instead of at runtime. Runtime template bugs are annoying, because they either bite you during testing, or they bite your users when they’re trying to use your app.
  4. The Angular Ivy template compiler will generate code that is human readable, which the current View Engine compiler doesn’t do. This will come in handy when trying to track down tough template bugs.

Angular 9

Here is an overview of Angular 9.

  • Mature Development with Angular
  • Understanding Angular View Engines
  • Angular Ivy Solves Long-Standing Problems
  • Angular Ivy and Mobile
  • Selector-less Directives
  • Angular Diagnostics Improvements
  • Internationalization with Angular Ivy
  • DI and Type-Safe in Angular 9
  • Dependency Injection Changes in Angular Core
  • Angular Benchmarks (Angular 8.2.7 vs. 9.0.0-next.5)

Angular 10

  • Configure Async Timeouts
  • Stale Lock File Reporting
  • Lazy Computation of basePaths
  • Merging Translation Files
  • Explicit Mapping

Angular 11

  • Component Test Harnesses
  • ESLint Updates
  • Updated Language Service Preview
  • Updated Hot Module Replacement (HMR) Support
  • Improved Reportings and Logging
  • Automatic Font Inliining

Angular’s Past, Present, and Future

If you’ve been using Angular from its early days all the way until now, then congratulations! While there have been plenty of rough patches, we’ve ended up with a fast, modern framework that is fun to use.

Ryan Peden

Ryan Peden is a full-stack developer from Toronto, Canada. He has been writing web apps since ES3 was state of the art.

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